India wants to make medical tourism a $9 billion industry by 2020

There are many reasons people go to India: the culture, the food, the weather. But in recent years, another factor drawing visitors is health care. India’s medical tourism industry could grow by 200% by 2020, hitting $9 billion, according to Ministry of Tourism figures. As it tries to expand the industry, the country is trying to make it easier for people to come for medical reasons. It’s touting advanced facilities, skilled doctors and low-cost treatment but also traditional practices such as yoga and Ayurveda. “India can provide medical and health…

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Ketamine-like depression treatment on track for FDA approval

A ketamine-like drug for treatment-resistant depression was backed by a US Food and Drug Administration advisory committee on Tuesday. If it is then approved by the FDA, the drug — called esketamine — may provide a new option for patients with major depressive disorder who have tried at least two other antidepressants without success. A panel of experts voted to endorse the drug, which is made in nasal spray form by the pharmaceutical company Janssen, a division of Johnson & Johnson. Fourteen members voted that the benefits outweighed the risk,…

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How a defibrillator implant is giving heart patients peace of mind

RICHMOND, Va. — Steve Hambleton recently received a defibrillator to help him manage an irregular heartbeat. Despite living a healthy and active life, he knows he’s at a higher risk of going into cardiac arrest. He recently had a defibrillator implanted to help ensure a healthy heart. “I walk anywhere from 10 to 15 miles a day,” Hambleton said. “So, having this is my security policy. If I were to have a heart attack, this would kick in as soon as that happened and revive me.” Sudden Cardiac Death is…

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Massive insect decline could have ‘catastrophic’ environmental impact, study says

Bees swarm in the sky as Palestinian workers remove frames from beehives to collect honeycombs in the Gaza Strip. Insect populations are declining precipitously worldwide due to pesticide use and other factors, with a potentially “catastrophic” effect on the planet, a study has warned. More than 40% of insect species could become extinct in the next few decades, according to the “Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers” report, published in the journal Biological Conservation. Insect biomass is declining by a staggering 2.5% a year, a rate…

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More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment, study finds

More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment to instead watch and wait to see whether their cancer progresses — and experts say that’s a good thing. Among men with low-risk prostate cancer in the United States, 42.1% used the watch-and-wait approach, also called “active surveillance,” in 2015, up from 14.5% in 2010, according to a study published in the medical journal JAMA on Monday. Compared with high-risk or intermediate-risk, low-risk prostate cancer tends to grow very slowly or not at all, which is why “active surveillance” can be considered as an alternative…

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VCU to build $350 million inpatient children’s facility at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU

RICHMOND, Va. — Children will soon have a new place to get healthy in Richmond. Virginia Commonwealth University Health System and Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU announced they would build a new $350 million, 86 bed inpatient children’s facility. The new building, which will be next to the current outpatient Children’s Pavilion on Marshall Street in downtown Richmond, is scheduled to open in 2022. “The completion of the Children’s Pavilion with a new inpatient hospital will provide an exclusively child-centered environment as advocated by patient families, our own pediatric…

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Theories explore why men send photos of their genitals

She’s sitting in a crowded subway car, zipping through email messages on her phone and minding her own business when it appears: a photo of a man’s penis. Sexting is so commonplace that 88% of participants — men and women — in a 2015 study said they’d done it. So common that research psychologist Peggy Drexler wonders if there’s even any stigma attached to it. So common that, as we found out last week, even someone as high-profile as Amazon founder Jeff Bezos said that an outlet threatened to release…

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Scientists say bees can do basic math

Does math give you trouble? Here’s some encouragement: Despite their miniature brains, a new study says honeybees can learn basic arithmetic. If they can do it, so can you! According to a study published this week in Science Advances, scientists at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, have shown that honeybees can add and subtract if trained to do so. This discovery helps scientists understand the relationship between brain size and brain power, perhaps knocking birdbrain off the list of perceived slights. Honeybees and humans are separated by more than 400 million…

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Man who spent six weeks in coma returns home to celebrate Christmas in February

SAN DIEGO – A California man who spent six weeks in a coma returned home Wednesday to celebrate Christmas in February with all of his neighbors, according to KSWB. Ryan Caine went to the hospital with flu-like symptoms on December 10th. Soon after, he was diagnosed with pneumonia that went septic, his family said. Caine was placed in the intensive care unit where he stayed for nearly six weeks. “His whole body was in a paralytic state and was completely run by machines for six weeks,” his mother Janet Caine…

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